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Psoriasis, Gluten, and My Food Journey

Ok, so there’s a lot of people talking about gluten-free living, diets, and recipes out there. Many people are discovering they have an intolerance, or even have Celiac disease, which is nothing to mess with. There are lots of reasons people avoid gluten… Not because “it’s a fad”…. more on that later.

Psoriasis, Gluten and My Food Journey

Me? I have an auto-immune skin disease. It’s called psoriasis. You can learn more about it here.

This is a very scary post for me to write. 

I’m not sure how you’re all going to react. But, my experience with blogging in the past has been one of surprise. The times I hesitate the most to hit the “publish” button have been some of the most amazing.

This may seem like a strange topic to cover on a food blog. Or not. I really believe there is a connection between food and health. Overly processed foods are slowly killing us. Don’t believe me? Put down the snack cake, and Google it. I’ll wait.

Lemme say this first: I’m just a gal, sharing my experience, and what I’ve learned.

You need to know (unless you didn’t already), I’m not a doctor, nutritionist, or otherwise medically trained professional. I can only go on my own experience, which I’d like to share with you here. I think it’s time.

It started five months ago.

I did a LOT of reading. So much that it made my head spin, and so tired, I was nauseous at the screen. Burning up my library card. Yeah, a LOT of reading. And I learned a lot from friends and others who have walked this path before me. You get the picture, right?

I found some things I didn’t know. So, I decided to try something I hadn’t before.

I wouldn’t say I found conclusive evidence of a link from psoriasis and gluten, but there were some eye-opening links. The words of a woman I met a year ago were ringing in my ears. She was also a psoriatic, who had discovered the only way to bring it under control was by eliminating gluten from her diet. I was intrigued at the time, and reminding of what she said by a friend around this time.

Why would I go to such extremes?

I didn’t go about eliminating gluten from my diet lightly. This is no small task, cheap (geez) or convenient. For some perspective on why I’d do this voluntarily, consider what psoriasis is (see link above), and what I was dealing with for nearly four decades:

Psoriasis and the Daily Good Times:

1. I have a rash that never went away.
2. People look at it, and think it’s contagious (it’s not). It makes them nervous, and they tend to stare.
3. Wearing black or any dark color is out of the picture, as my scalp flakes if I turned my head. Seriously.
4. Wearing sleeveless tops or dresses was embarrassing. (see #2)
5. Wearing my hair up was sketchy, as the lesions were visible. (see #2)
6. The dryness of my skin overall was unbearable, and there’s not a lotion on earth that helped.
7. My scalp was itching all the time, severely. All.the.time. ALL. *sigh*
8. I had visible lesions on my forehead (see #2).
9. Wearing a swim suit was no fun, as lesions are everywhere. (see #2)
10. Winter (and rainy season, so about 300 days a year where I live) meant worsening of the rash, itching, and flaking. Good times.

So, what were my options, and things available to me up to this point?

Injections
Steroids
Creams of all kinds
Other drugs with some unfavorable side effects
Indoor tanning (low pressure beds… Skin cancer anyone?)
Sun = I live in the Pacific Northwest. Not so much available.
Lifelong companionship with the challenges listed above.

Bleh.

So, I thought, “what do I have to lose by changing my diet”? Not a thing. If it didn’t work, I could go back to what I was doing before. I knew how to do that, right?

Let’s do this thing!

Three months ago, I decided to go completely gluten-free, with my entire (awesomely supportive) family. We took the deep dive, and I committed to 6 months. Sauces were changed, flours packed or given away. Gluten-free apps downloaded. Cookbooks researched. Wheeeeeee!!!!

Here’s what happened (because I documented the whole thing):

One week:
Itching substantially subsided.
Felt less bloated overall, especially after meals.

One month:
I didn’t have a single migraine (I usually had these 1-2x per month).
Lesions were disappearing.

Two months:
Feeling less fatigue when I woke up (I always thought I was just “not a morning person”).
Rash was “flattening out” and less red.
My *ahem* movements vastly improved (enough said).
Didn’t feel so ravenously hungry overall.

Before & After

Three months:
It was around this time I discovered that I had lost THREE INCHES over my entire body. I knew this, because I took all my measurements (and before pictures, one above) before I started all this.
WIN!
Also? NO menstral cramps or migraine headaches the entire time. HUGE win.

Now at 5 months… Who knows what’s next?

Sleeveless at 5 Months!

Thru this journey…

I’ve had food sensitivity tests done. All interesting stuff, and there are numbers I need to work on, so knowledge is power. I’ve started some supplements recommended by my doctor. I also had vitamin B shots (um, OW), which really helped me turn the corner. He’s also suggested that wheat should be eliminated from my diet for life. It’s all helping, and I’m grateful (but not in a hurry to repeat those twice weekly vitamin B shots!)

Why I’m sharing this with you…

You might have noticed I’ve posted some gluten-free recipes. I have even mentioned our dietary changes along the way. I’m not sure why I was hesitant to write about all this, or share it, except that I am still working it out in my head. But hey, who knows, maybe my experience can help someone. That is my sincere hope in sharing something so deeply personal.

Some of the things in my head…

I was nervous to share this (I think I said that, but it bears repeating). I know how I used to think when people I knew “went all gluten-free”. Here’s what I thought (and I’m ashamed to even admit it, but in the spirit of honesty…):

“Gluten-free in a bakery? Really? Go next door!”
“It’s such a fad, good grief.”
“Yeah, gluten is your problem, sure. *eye roll*”
“Seriously, what’s WITH her? Just eat the damned bread and stop being so picky!”

Here’s what I thought when I “went gluten-free”:

People will think I’m high maintenance.
Is this really an issue for me?
Is this all in my head?
Is this really all necessary?
Is this just a fad diet I’m jumping on?
People are saying the same things in their head that I am (see above).

Know what I mean?

Here’s what I know today: I feel better. My skin is vastly improved.This is my experience, and I can’t tell you how to feel, or what to do. I own my experience, and my perspective.

So where to from here? I’m going to keep on keeping on. This blog is a food blog, and about what happens around the table. That hasn’t changed, and isn’t likely to. It’s also about my perspective, and those who share the table. That would be you.

I want to help others, encourage, teach, and offer what I can from my experience. I hope this helps you, or someone you know. In the end, that’s what it’s all about.

Thank you for reading my story.


Psst… I wrote a follow-up to this post, listing my favorite resources so far. Go check it out here.

Comments

Andy Hayes
Reply

We’re here because of you, not because we necessarily needed a gluten fix (that is, obviously, easy to find elsewhere).

Thanks for sharing your story – we’re here to support you!

Nicole Young
Reply

Thank you for sharing, Brandie! I’ve considered going GF for a while (I get weird stomach cramps and can’t pinpoint the cause), even tried it once but got too lazy to continue. 🙂 It’s nice to see a post about it that shows it has benefits for non-celiacs, too.

Brandie Kajino
Reply

If you ever decide to do it, let me know how I can help. 🙂

Deb Lee
Reply

Sooo glad you published this post! You are helping so many people by sharing your story. Btw, I think you’re awesome sauce and I stand firmly in your corner. Super cute pic of you and your little man. =)

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Thanks so much girl. You’re awesome sauce too. 🙂

Sarah Salter
Reply

Oh my gosh! YES! YES! YES! You spoke my very thoughts, Brandie!

I didn’t go off of gluten because of my psoriasis. I went off of it because I learned that I was allergic (not celiac, though), plus, one of my healthcare providers had discussed it as part of dealing with my polycystic ovarian syndrome. However, I can be completely sympathetic about your psoriasis. I was diagnosed with psoriasis at age 11, but for whatever reason, in my late twenties, it began manifesting STRONGLY on my hands. For more than 5 years, my hands NEVER healed. Literally, there wasn’t a single day when I didn’t have at least 7-9 fingers cracked, split, and bleeding. I had to learn to do things with utensils that most people could do with their fingers. (Ever try to eat chicken wings with a knife and fork? It’s no picnic.) There was actually a time I had to dial my cell phone with my NOSE because my fingers were all bandaged and my phone’s touchscreen wouldn’t “see” my bandaged fingers.

The turnaround for me came when I started taking fish oil. But I imagine that going off of gluten has helped, too. 🙂

But YES, all of the false assumptions you listed… Those were my thoughts, too.

So, don’t feel bad, my friend! You’re in good company! Thanks for sharing!!

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Wow! That’s quite a story! I am also taking Omega 3s as well. How interesting!

Carol S.
Reply

Wow! Just found this through Pinterest. As a LONG time psoriasis sufferer who also experiences many of your same symptoms-bloating, female “stuff”, scalp issues, and horrible patches from the soles of my feet to the palms of my hands (not fun at all!)-this was enlightening! I have had every treatment imaginable-even steroids injected into the bottom of my feet with an air gun type device–ouch! I think I need to take a new look at my diet! I have a pretty “clean” diet, but think I need to rethink a few things! The large irritated patches have been quiet for a few years, but the stomach issues and scalp patches still exist. I had to have a hysterectomy last year and some things settled down, but it is still a problem. Glad to have found you- and thanks for your honesty!!! As Sarah said above, you are in good company!!!

Oh, and Sarah- I feel your pain with the bandages on your fingers! My doctor had me wrapping my hands in saran wrap after applying medication. Real easy to get around like that! 🙂

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Welcome from Pinterest!
I’m so glad you found it helpful! I would love to know how it goes for you. Together we are better 🙂

Renee
Reply

You are a brave woman Brandie, and I’m very happy for your success thus far. I see only good things to come for you on this journey. Cheers! (with a gluten free beer of course)

Diane (Yo Ma)
Reply

OH. If only we had a hint of this solution when you were first showing symptoms…..we would have done anything to help. So very glad you finally found relief!

I am inching toward gluten free for a variety of reasons and you are an inspiration. Thank you!!

Brandie Kajino
Reply

It’s a step, right? We will see how it plays out long term. It’s improvement I’ve not seen with anything else!
There’s so much new information available now!

Liz
Reply

I have been gluten-free for over 18 months now – it reduces (doesn’t eliminate but I’ll settle for any reduction) some of the symptoms of my ME. I’m glad that it has improved your health so much and look forward to being inspired by some of your recipes 🙂

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Wow! I had never heard of this. I’m so glad what you’re doing is helping!

Sheri Johnson
Reply

Brandi,way to go. You are so right, all of our processed foods are killing us and our darn government promotes it. I read in a magazine about how our sugar consumption has gone done, but consumption of high fructose corn syrup has spiked over the past 30 years in beverages and processed foods. Its taking the hard work of people like you educating the rest of us, Thank you!

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Thanks Sheri. I hope everyone eats more real food, no matter their situation. We will all be better off!

Amy McGeachy
Reply

Love, love, love this post Brandie. Processed foods are killing us and even some whole foods that have been genetically modified. I could not agree more. And, why aren’t more people aware of this? We have some huge problems in the US when it comes to our food and food system. Healthcare Reform should include some revamp of our food system. Seriously.

Martin
Reply

Glad to see I am not the only one – to me that is a confirmation that it was not in my head only. I had scalp and nail psoriasis more than 3 decades and always heard from doctors that it is incurable. After I have given up alcohol and gluten for other reasons it was gone in 2 months.

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Isn’t that interesting! I just noticed that my nail psoriasis is almost gone! Woohoo!

Jennifer
Reply

I have emailed your post to a friend, as it was so relevant and beautifully written, but I just realised how recent it is. I am a family doctor, and have had a slowly growing awareness about gluten issues. Separately, I’ve heard people say how Vitamin D (which in Australia is increasingly recognized as commonly deficient in cool, multicultural places like my city, Melbourne) has improved their psoriasis dramatically.
I have checked with Dr Google, and am sad to see that current information for doctors doesn’t mention trialling a gluten free diet, or simple oral Vitamin D supplementation. Especially sad when treatments for severe psoriasis are really hard core. So now I plan to ask my friendly neighborhood dermatologist what he knows and thinks about this. There have been a couple of articles reminding doctors that oral Vit D is still an option for psoriasis, but that isn’t information a busy family doctor is likely to come across. Sigh.

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Thank you for sharing my article. I hope it is helpful.
I would love it if you report back on what you learn!

M. Feord
Reply

I have had extensive psoriasis since a teen which I treated using everything from tar, UVB sessions at my Dermatologist’s office to Methotrexate for more than ten years. In 2003, I was hospitalized with a small bowel obstruction and was NPO for two weeks. I had stopped Methotrexate to have a child a few years previously, and was only using topical steroids and phototherapy to control my skin. My psoriasis flared badly from the pain of the obstruction but, remarkedly, it almost completely cleared again in the two weeks NPO. My Dermatologist initially attributed this to a well known effect of not eating. But, over the next two to three months, as my diet advanced to include liquids and then soft foods, and then regressed twice as I suffered repeat obstructions, it became very clear that my psoriasis flared whenever I ate bread. We did a diet challenge and confirmed that my psoriasis actually flared when I ate any form of gluten. It is now more than ten years later and I have been able to keep my skin 99 percent clear by following a gluten free diet. I only need topicals after I suffer a cold or the flu, or have another small bowel obstruction. I consider a gluten free diet to be an absolute miracle because not only did it clear my psoriasis, but it markedly improved my Psoriatic Arthritis and Asthma as well. I wholeheartedly recommend anyone who suffers from autoimmune illness to try it.

Brandie Kajino
Reply

What an incredible story! Thank you so much for taking the time to share it. I hope it will help others!

(Also, for those that aren’t aware, I believe “NPO” in this comment refers to no food. This might help:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nil_per_os
(I had to look it up! 🙂

Anne
Reply

Thank you for sharing your journey. I have battled psoriosis for over 30 years and have used the creams just to have it come back 2 days after it dissapears. My dermatologist want me to go on shots now…..
I have a Dr’s appt Monday to talk about getting tested for wheat intolerance and discuss diet options including GF since I do not want to go the Embrel route. Is your whole family GF now or do you cook seperate meals for yourself? Was that difficult for the rest of your family?

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Hi Anne,

Thanks for sharing YOUR journey too. I wasn’t too hip to doing the shots either. It seems everyone with psoriasis has a different trigger or solution. Minimize stress (yoga and meditation is good for me), get in the sun for 15 minutes, etc. It’s amazing what a difference the wheat elimination made. It’s not gone, but it’s not nearly so “angry”. It’s such a process.
I’m so glad my story helped you. Please come back and share what works for you too!

kdosi
Reply

Hello Brandi, I just wanted to let you know that going gluten free worked for me too! I was quite sceptical. But after a couple of months my psoriasis seems to be gone!

Brandie Kajino
Reply

I’m so happy to hear that! What a wonderful thing for you! 🙂

Cynthia
Reply

Great information tastefully written. My daughter’s psoriasis disappeared when she went off gluten two year ago (and counting). We can tell if she gets an accidental hit of it – it shows up on her thumbs in a couple of days. Now and then we do a food ‘cleanse’ eating all raw for a week. The rest of the time now we are gluten free vegan. I have autoimmune issues too, and have been GF for 2.5 years. Removing gluten helped my PMS, migraines, hair loss, tongue spots, hand tremor, facial wrinkles, MS-like symptoms, energy, and mood, though alas I did not lose weight. Gluten really was slowly killing me. The skin is the window into health, so never think ‘it’s just a skin problem’ — it is a sign of a deeper problem (chronic internal inflammation) that can affect any organ and lead to MS, cancer, Crohns, Lupus, Rheumatoid arthritis, and on and on.

Jennifer
Reply

The recent posts have reminded me that I need to ask that friendly dermatologist some questions. One thing about this is that if gluten does seem to help someone’s psoriasis, it can be very clear to them that it is real. If psoriasis goes away after stopping gluten and then comes back with gluten, and does that a number of times, the chances of it being coincidental are pretty low. It is almost certainly either the gluten, or something very closely associated with it (eg some other part of wheat)
Even if this only works for a few people with psoriasis, it seems well worth a try. By which I mean to say, I am appreciating hearing people’s stories.

Brandie Kajino
Reply

I agree Jennifer. I wish more people would be given the option of using diet as a means to heal.

Michele
Reply

Brandie,
I’m so happy for you and proud of you!!!!!!
My sister has severe psoriasis and just began a gf meal plan delivered to her home. Your post brought tears to my eyes, because your story matched hers. I’m sharing your post with her and hoping for success for her like yours!!!!
Sharing this will help others, because many Drs are not suggesting this because they’re undereducated or resistant to food being used for healing or being unhealthful as in gluten intolerance and celiac to some people. Intolerance (someone who has symptoms to gluten or grains but testing is not conclusive to celiac) is now finally being considered serious and a precursor to full blown celiac.
When I had several serious health issues in 2004, it was my aunt who suggested gf to me, because she was diagnosed gluten intolerant. I asked my Dr for antibody testing which came back positive. GF changed my life and my health. Many DRs and people will not believe that my energy, thyroid, gastro, rash-gutate psoriasis, headaches, arthritis, neurological and endometriosis issues resolved!!!!!
I’ve never told my gf story on my blog, but i post gf recipes. Swing by:)

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Thanks so much Michele! What an incredible story. You definitely should share your story. You’d be amazed how awesome people will be about it. 🙂

Kim
Reply

I’m glad to have come across your blog. I have celiac disease and also mild psoriasis. I didn’t pay attention to how long or when my patch cleared up, as when I found out I had celiac disease and went gluten-free, I didn’t know the two could be related. (It’s now about 2 mm across.: -)) Now my 6 year old daughter has had psoriasis for 2 years, slowly getting worse. Her ped. doesn’t want to do blood tests for celiac because she doesn’t have any “symptoms…” I wish doctors would at least try to stay up-to-date. Anyway, he does support us trying a gluten-free diet for her but expects results within 2 weeks! This seems crazy to me. We are at day 4 and still no change. So good to see that it took 3+ months for you, not glad that it took a long time, but that we shouldn’t give up so soon. We will try this for the long haul. Not too hard since all I really need to do is swap out her sandwich bread and her school snack. The whole family eats my gf dinners.
Thank you for the encouragement.

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Thanks for visiting! Yes, mine took a while, and now that the weather has changed, it’s flared up a bit. But not as bad as in the past!
I hope time will help your little one. No fun.
Hang in there!

Kim C
Reply

Great article. I’m 47 and have had psoriasis since I was 18. Your list was bang on. I completely believe its all about diet.

I did juice and veg only cleanse for 30 days and my psoriais almost disappeared. That was 4 months ago and I’ve slowly gone back to old habits. Now the psoriasa is back full force so I’m back to juicing and mostly vegetables to clear it up.

I hope our message gets out that psoriais can be improved by diet rather than the horrifying drugs that are available. I had an epiphany this morning. I have a disease and it is only going to improve with diet, similar to diabetes ( although not nearly as serious as diabetes, just a comparison).

Thx for your post!

Kim

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Thanks for sharing your experience Kim! Isn’t it interesting how many ways there are to make our situations better? I’m so grateful you’ve shared your experience!

Holly
Reply

Thank you for writing this! I have psoriasis and am getting desperate. I’ve tried all the prescription creams and lotions out there. I’m a genetics student and know way too much about the side effects of injections or UV therapy…so basically it’s been “just deal with it until you’re desperate enough to risk your health”. I’m now starting to research gluten free for psoriasis, and this post really made me feel it’s possible! So thank you for being brave enough to share… I feel your anxiety about sharing! 🙂

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Thanks so much for stopping by Holly. I wish you all the best in your endeavors. I hope you’ll come back and share!

Mary
Reply

Hi Brandie: I have had psoriasis my whole life. I thought I would share a tips that works for me on my scalp. I generally use neutrogena or a coal tar shampoo mixed with regular shampoo. The thing that seems to have completely eliminated ALL lesions is blow drying my hair. Mine is about the length of yours in the photo. Growing my mom made me keep it short, easier to keep – we never used a hair dryer to speak of. I find that if I air dry I may get a small lesion pop up – so usually try not to air dry – I know it sounds silly – but it works for me

Mary
Reply

Thanks also for putting yourself out there. I have been changing my diet considerably in the last few weeks, to get my weight down where it should be. I had not considered gluten may be an issue with the psoriasis. I am also looking closely at dairy. I have a post – nasal drip that shows up periodically, I am thinking one trigger is dairy. Now I wonder if gluteus may add to that.

vins
Reply

Thank you for sharing this valuable information. I have severe dandruff and when consulted dermatologist concluded it as psoriasis. Im just 24, im shocked and undergoing severe trauma. I console myself at your success. I live in India where wheat and Rice are staple diet.. Brandie and mary please give your valuable suggestions.

Mary
Reply

Vins, I have found that salt water and sun help lessen the severity of lesions. I could not believe that just blow drying my hair could have such an impact, but that seems to be the case. I was plagued with scalp issues for most of my life, no more. I also use the neutrogena shampoo I mentioned. I will post more as i figure out if Brandie’s diet suggestions help me. I read that rice is gluten free – in all forms – exception being rice preseasoned.

vins
Reply

Thank you mary for the reply.i have done my anti tTg -A test(Gluten sensitivity) the results were quite normal(i have just 2.6 lot less than normal 12). still should i suspect wheat diet or is there any other protien in the diet that is affecting. Please stay in touch mary

vins
Reply

mary have u done gluten sensitivity test.. if not any other tests

Mary
Reply

Vins
I have not done any tests, – i recently made a lifestyle change to my diet, and amnit sure if I will get the test at this point, a lot going on in my life – will let you know what I decide when I have time to slow down.

vins
Reply

thank you mary… did you refrain from diary products and eggs too

Mary
Reply

Vins
Dairy yes, eggs no

vins
Reply

Hi Brandie you have mentioned that you have done food sensitivity tests, please mention what are they and what are the results…

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Hi Vins, I took several tests, mostly IgA testing. They were really inconclusive. Also, my celiac test was negative, but I was also gluten-free for several months, so who knows.

Here’s the thing: I feel better, and my skin is WAY better after eliminating gluten/wheat. That’s proof enough for me. Everyone’s path is different, so I’d encourage everyone to do what they feel is best for them. Be sure to talk with you doctor or naturopath.

Best to you all!

clarence anthony
Reply

Hi Brandie, I am glad you did this blog. Like you, I have psoriasis too. I decided to go GF after visiting a naturopath in Oct 2013. I am in my 3rd month now and I have never felt so top of the world as I do now. My lesions have all flattened out and turning very light pink. I feel so energised and I have lost 10 kg todate. I also take supplements like fish oil and isotonix and probiotics. By the way I am not from the US. Merry Christmas and a happy GF 2014. Greetings from Singapore.

Brandie Kajino
Reply

I’m so glad to hear that! What a wonderful change for you 🙂

aishwarya
Reply

my daughter now 18 had sebo-psoriasis(it is an overlpping condition of scalp psoriasis and seborrhic dermatitis) on scalp for past 5 yrs. and using coaltar or salcilic acid shampoos. every alternate day she uuses it.it is pretty bad in winter. It has become a big hurdle for her . a what tests show that they have gluten allergy? if we try gluten free diet does it cause nutritional deficiency? thanks in advance.

Brandie Kajino
Reply

I would check with your doctor. Everyone’s experience will vary on the gluten testing.

kara K
Reply

Hey Brandie,

I have been debating starting. Blog on my psoriasis and gluten adventure. I have terrible psoriasis for 29 years almost 75% of my body was covered. It went away when i gor pregnant for the most part which was the first time i ever thought there might be a chance i could tame the beast. As soon as i had my daugher it came back almost immediately. Last sept i went gf, after about 6 months almost conpletely clear. I guess intolerant is more the word, a little soy sauce doesnt flare me up. Last month we traveled a little i ate bad, and wow almost im ediately it came back. I have friends who support this food journey and others who laugh at it. Thank you for sharing your story!!!

Hugs,

Kara

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Thanks for sharing yours as well! Mine was really bad after I had my son. It’s amazing when I look back at pictures!

aelaine328
Reply

Brandie,

I am so happy to have stumbled upon your post while googling the link between psoriasis and gluten. I am 23 years old and have suffered from psoriasis almost since birth. I have been on every type of medication there is…including the dreaded biologic medication, Enbrel. I am determined to find a way to treat this disease without using drugs that only mask the symptoms. My doctor is convinced that I will be on Enbrel for the rest of my life. I cannot accept that. I recently had a blood test done through a local pharmacy that indicated I have a slight wheat intolerance. I also sought the help of a nutrition counselor who suggested I avoid wheat like the plague. I went wheat free for 21 days. I noticed a vast improvement in stomach pains and my plaques weren’t increasing. Some have told me that the improvements were psychosomatic effects and feel that over time, my psoriasis will come back full force. I am most likely going to try a wheat free diet again, but for longer this time. I am really hoping for the best, I would love to treat my psoriasis naturally. Thanks for your wonderful post.

-Annie

Robin
Reply

Brandie,

Your blog has caught my undivided attention.

I have suffered with psoriasis for the past 35 years. I have two types, plaque and guttate. I’ve had the plaque since I was 12 years old. My pattern with the plaque psoriasis has not been to bad, but I have never been able to get rid of it on my knees and elbows. The guttate is a nightmare when it flares- typically triggered by strep throat. I’ve had a flare twice, and my awesome dermatologist has treated me with UVB treatment, and boom within a month it’s gone. Additionally, my husband has the exact types I have. I’ve been told this gives our children about a 99%chance of having it (1 does so far). Anyway, I have a nutritional science degree and work in a hospital. Well a few RD’s and I decided to try a gluten free diet ourselves starting 1/1/14, just to see how our bodies react and to make it easier to speak to our patients about our educated recommendations. Well it’s been 14 days (not very long), and the psoriasis that has been on my knees and elbows for 35 years is fading.

This is how I happened upon your blog- I wanted to know everything I could about the connection. I’m not totally getting my hopes up, but thank you for sharing your research and story. I’m going to Hawaii in a month and so far I am hopeful that I won’t hear, “what happened to your knees” (I always say, “I fell off my skateboard”).

Thank you,
Robin

P.S. My now retired wonderful dermatologist told me to never use steroids for the psoriasis, because you will end up dependent on them- Once you stop, it comes back with a vengeance. His instructions; Get out in the sun for 20 minutes on days you can (UVB light), don’t use soaps to clean your skin (water is enough- except in the hygienic areas), and douse yourself with crisco or vasaline when you get out of the shower (keep your skin moist).

Kat
Reply

Thank you for sharing! I am about to take the plunge into a gluten-free diet. My psoriasis is not terrible, but it’s slowly spreading. My dermatologist had no clue about possible dietary triggers when I asked, and of course I did a potent topical steroid at first. It totally disappeared… and then came right back when I stopped. So, I’m conducting my own diet experiments. I’ve tried going off sugar, I mean ALL sugar even agave, “evaporated cane juice,” “brown rice syrup.” ALL sugar, even if it’s packaged in brown and green and found in the “health food” store/section. I’m glad I did it, especially after the binge-fest of the holidays this year, sugar never did anyone any health favors… but no change in my skin spots. Great. I feel annoyed and depressed about going GF, especially since I am already a committed vegan. REALLY? Vegan AND gluten-free?? It’s just not right. Talk about being high maintenance!! In big cities I can finally find a vegan restaurant or at least one with vegan options. But assuredly, they are glutinous. UGH. Anyway, your blog has given me hope. Thank you again for sharing.

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Hi Kat,
I hope it helps you. I completely understand feeling high maintenance. But you know what? You, and your health, are worth it. 🙂

Laura
Reply

Kat, I know how you feel…I’m a life-long vegetarian but became vegan a year ago. I’ve never had a drink in my life, and don’t use caffeine. However, I’ve suffered from psoriasis since childhood which covers my scalp, inside my ears, and eventually showed up on my left elbow. I consider this to be mild psoriasis. I’ve spent years scratching, using antibacterial (or soap and water), and then lotion over and over again in that order to keep it from spreading anywhere else, since psoriasis thrives on dry skin. Going vegan helped decrease symptoms, but not enough. (Tho haven’t had a cold in ages, so that’s a plus.) I’ve been considering going GF for a variety of reasons…I’m 28 and have had acne for 15 years, frequent migraines, gastric issues, trouble gaining weight, etc and heard that a GF diet might help. Didn’t want to take the plunge because it’s hard enough to find decent vegan food unless I make it myself, much less vegan AND gluten-free. However, the psoriasis is the bane of my existence, so I’m willing to try anything at this point, especially since I want to have kids in the next year or 2. I inherited psoriasis from my mom… I’m hoping to find a solution for my own psoriasis so if this works, my future kids can follow the same diet and hopefully avoid the symptoms of psoriasis completely.

Cyndi in California
Reply

oh my goodness.. thank you for your story… i suffer from… very similar to mine… it’s such a challenge and depressing! i am going to look into the gf diet.

ronp
Reply

The latest issue of Scientific American has an article on wheat flour and gluten. Gluten has taken the blame for lots of things, but it might well be (the article states) a couple of hard to pin point proteins that co-exist in the wheat that cause the damage. Wheat free might well be the answer, more than gluten free. But I share your experience. And, unscientific as it seems, I went through this for years before I stumbled across the connection.

jesseelane
Reply

I’M GLUTEN FREE, ITCHING WENT AWAY IMMEDIATELY, UNLESS I SLIP AND ACCIDENTALLY HAVE GLUTEN, MY QUESTION IS DID YOU USE LOTIONS OR CREAMS AFTER GOING GLUTEN FREE?

Jeanette
Reply

Has anybody suggested that any of you might actually have dermatitis herpetiformis, another form of gluten intolerance,(Celiac Disease being the other) ? It is very important to know if you have either of these conditions because of the other conditions associated with the celiac condition, such a osteoporosis and lymphoma to mention two. Self diagnosis and treatment can be very dangerous, and also does not allow for the possibility of diagnosing other family members. Check out any celiac association site for accurate information on CD AND HP. Many folk think they are eating GF but without guidance and support from professionals, it is fraught with many pitfalls. I speak from 30 years on a strict GF diet because I have biopsy proven CD. That given, psoriasis is an autoimmune condition and sometimes the conditions go together. BUT- proper diagnosis is essential if the correct treatment is to be followed.

Jackie anderson
Reply

I went low carb to support my husband with a diabetes diagnosis. Low carb is by default pretty much gluten free. Not only did my scalp psoriasis all but disappear, but the chronic anemia I have had for 8 plus years went away too. I had been treated with b12 injections and mega iron supplements and even endometrial ablation surgery to lower blood loss. Wasn’t until 6 months of gf that it started to turn around and 1.5 years later still have good numbers. Psoriasis meds gone, and no itchy scalp. Other side effects of gf for me? No more blood pressure or cholesterol meds either! Nice article!

Brandie Kajino
Reply

That’s quite a story, wow! Thanks for sharing, and for your compliments. Best to you!

Kat
Reply

Hi Brandie. It’s Kat again. (See Jan 27 above.) I have been off gluten for 6 weeks now and have seen no change in my skin. It actually started getting worse so I was forced to start back on calciptoriene (Vit D) ointment, though I refuse to go back on the topical steroid. I wanted to ask how strict you are. For example, if the ingredient list says “may have traces of wheat,” or “processed in a facility with wheat,” do you eat or avoid? Because that makes an already limited selection even far more limited. I’m getting sort of depressed about the whole thing. (Last night I dreamed I bit into a fluffy, steaming, glutenous pizza crust and then, realizing my error, spit it all out!) I think my situation is not helped by the fact that my Vitamin D level is abysmally low, so I have decided to AGGRESSIVELY work on getting that back up to par with supplementation. Also, any thoughts on alcohol consumption? The thought of giving up bread and wine BOTH (in addition to being vegan, if you recall) is, well… sad. But, I suppose not as sad as ugly red splotches all over me. UGH! But then, I want to know which item is the offender, so part of me wants to wait to trial off all alcohol until I have proven it is not the gluten… so how long do I wait?! I am a physician and am greatly irritated at the medical community for providing me with next to zero sound research/evidence on this topic. I have a good friend who is a doctor of naturopathy and she said to wait 3 months. What exactly that is based on, I am not sure. If I have made it this far I can make it 6 more weeks. Anyone care to weigh in on the duration you were gluten free before your skin cleared? Additionally, I have noticed that my consumption of corn and rice has skyrocketed since going off wheat/gluten. What if there is something irritating/inflammatory in those products? Corn especially has been modified to death through the years as wheat has. Just a thought. Thanks for listening! Any advice from anyone is greatly appreciated.

jackie anderson
Reply

One of the doctors on XM doctor radio said wine was gluten free since it’s made with grapes. Each one may be different, but generally speaking wine should be safe if you are sensitive to gluten. It triggers my scalp psoriasis, and I only found it out by eliminating it. Best of luck to you!

Stephanie Flood
Reply

Thank you so much for writing this blog post! After reading, I’m finally convinced I need to try this. Like you, I’ve hesitated because nothing turns me off of something more than it being a “diet du jour” or hearing about people like Gwenyth Paltrow doing it (sometimes I think she’ll try anything!) Plus, I too know the “Heartbreak of Psoriasis.

I’m 37 and have had SEVERE debilitating Psoriasis my whole life (plaque and generalized pustular). I’ve done steroids, Goekkerman (tar/UV/Puva), Methrotrexate, immunosupressives, Enbrel, Humira, and Remicade. I spent 10 years almost totally clear from Remicade infusions, but it caused drug induced Hepatitis, and I had to cease treatment. This caused a massive, full body, flare up of pustular psoriasis and now, I’m on a combination of prednisone and Stellara. I can’t take most other treatments because of their effects on my now healing liver. There is pain, irritiation, and dryness all the time…I miss that decade of peace and quiet. Prior to that, the only other time it was in remission was when I was early in my pregnancy for my daughter. My doctor believes this is because your body naturally suppresses the immune system early in pregnancy to prevent the body from rejecting it. Plus, your body is doing everything it can to be in the best condition for the child. Later in my pregnancy, my symptoms got a LOT worse and I had my first pustular psoriasis flare up. It took months to clear with prednisone and finally, some Remicade.

The Stellara I’m using now isn’t working as well, and certainly doesn’t last the 12 weeks it’s supposed to. I have a LOT of medication allergies and am also very lactose intolerant. I have migraines weekly and other weird symptoms that could be associated with a hypersensitivity to gluten. I’ve got a lot of blood tests scheduled and, I guess it’s something that I’m going to have to narrow down.

Thank you for opening yourself up to the world and showing pictures of the changes you’ve seen. Even if it doesn’t work that well for me, a more sensible diet would not harm. Good luck and I hope that you continue to have success with this!

Lucia Evans
Reply

Thanks so much for sharing your story. I did the same almost 2 years ago. I do have occassional flares but my psoriasis is soooo much better without gluten. Its really nice to know other people have had good results as well. I love what you said to someone who commented “we are better together” Amen sister! Psoriasis is the worst and anything that can help or make a person feel better is worth trying. I had it for over 30 years! I also live in the PNW so I feel you on the sun is not much of an option. I will be following your blog/website! Thanks again!

Brandie Kajino
Reply

What a sweet comment. Thank you! I’m so glad to hear your story. I hope others will read it too, and have hope! Thanks for commenting and hope to see you around here more. 🙂

Chelsea Mosley
Reply

I’m so happy I found this! I’m 23 and I have had psoriasis since I was 5. My doctors always said that it was “triggered” by an allergic reaction to penicillin and that I would grow out of it….still haven’t 18 years later and it’s getting worse since I also have psoriatic arthritis (I feel like an old woman at 23!). I’ve been considering going gluten free but i’ve always wondered if it would actually help. Definitely going to give it a try!

Brandie Kajino
Reply

I’m so glad you came by, Chelsea! I hope it helps, and be sure and report back on your progress. 🙂

aelaine328
Reply

I just found your comment and I just wanted to say “Hi” because I just turned 24 and have had psoriasis since I was 5 too! Psoriasis is in my gene pool but I really want to try helping myself without medications. I have been off my medicine (Enbrel) for a few months and my psoriasis is definitely there but not spreading. So, I’m hoping that a gluten and dairy free diet might help clear the spots that I have. I’ll do just about anything to clear my scalp. lol.

Scott
Reply

I developed psoriasis about 1.5 years ago. 36 years old. It started as a small patch on my palm, and in about 6 months both hands were covered w/ palmoplantar pustular psoriasis. Feet too, but not as bad. I went through the usual unhelpful doctor visits. Topical steroids, prednisone, etc. Last June I couldn’t work almost the entire month, because my hands were raw. The Dr’s clearly don’t know what they are talking about. One visit he called it eczema, then psoriasis, then dyshidrotic eczema, and finally pustular psoriasis. (I guess the dermatologists only have words to describe various sets of symptoms, but don’t really know the cause, or what to do about it. It’s frustrating, because Google can do the same).

I cut out gluten last June when I was going through the worst of it, and it started to heal. I discontinued all the steroids the doctors gave me. Within a couple of months I had a solid layer of skin on my hands again. By Dec it had stabilized to where it is now. I get the beginnings of a breakout, which for pustular psoriasis are little bumps (almost like pimples), but only a few at a time, and they heal quickly.

My Doctors refused to believe diet could make any difference, refused to give me any allergy testing. I’ve seriously lost any trust I had in doctors. I saw several and they barely spent any time with me, and are not willing to discuss non pharmaceutical options. They’re really nothing more than sales people!! (I’m sure (or hope) there are good doctors out there, open minded, working in labs, doing research, etc, but the ones average people get to see in little offices in our neighborhoods are just pharmaceutical salesmen)

I’m glad to see others have found going gluten free helps them as well! Spread the word!!

Brandie Kajino
Reply

What a wonderful story! I’m so glad it is helping you!

Lisa Gill
Reply

I’m so HAPPY I found this blog I have had psoriasis most of my life and after having my son who’s 3 years old now it’s gotten worse with no clear ups at all. Been doing a lot a research on a GFD and have been on the fence but after reading this article and all the post I’m definitely going to make the step into this new life style God bless all of you for sharing it really is an answered prayer. Lisa

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Lisa, thank you for your comment, I am so touched. I hope it is the answer you are looking for. Please report back and let us know how it goes!

Mary
Reply

I checked in here a number of months ago. Inhave modified my diet considerably since Oct, and added gluten free in January. My psoriasis is looking clearer than ever – It seems to be slowly clearing up. I will continue to keep you informed. I read a book titled – It starts with food – I have made a lot of diet changes based on that book as well.

mary
Reply

In October to lose weight I went on a very strict diet of chicken, fish fruits and vegetables and my plaque psoriasis improved as well as my psoriatic arthritis to the point where I am no longer taking methotrexate injections every week but still having Remicade infusions every 8 weeks. I didn’t put the two things together though until I changed my diet and started adding carbs with bread and pasta and within two weeks of doing so my skin is noticeably worse. Yesterday I began a gluten free diet again (goodbye beer) and will check my progress when I go to the Dr. In two weeks. The other good thing is I am down 20 lbs which has helped with my arthritis.

Brandie Kajino
Reply

How awesome! Congratulations. I hope you continue to improve ^_^

Natalie Calder
Reply

I am so relieved to hear someone else’s story with almost all of my same symptoms and to hear that there may be a light at the end of the tunnel. I’ve been diagnosed with Gastroesophogeal Reflux disease, waiting to see about the psoriasis diagnosis, other skin problems, migraine headaches 1-2x per month, depression, cloudy brain, injury that won’t heal. My physical therapist said I am most likely suffering from gluten intolerance. It is quite a difficult transition. Especially with not alot of support. I’m really looking forward to reading your GF recipes. I am even considering being grain free but that seriously terrifies me. I don’t want to do it alone ;/

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Natalie I hope what you find here helps you. 🙂

Jackie Anderson
Reply

I joined in on my hubbys diabetes prescription of very low carbs to support him. I didn’t know that my psoriasis would improve or I’d have done it sooner. There are a ton of good recipes for gluten free, so even though it’s scary to change your diet, it’s for the best. I missed pizza most, and found a great replacement, google “holy grail pizza crust”, and they have a recipe for cheese danish at uplateanyway.com that I will never have to worry about cheating with a pasty again. It’s definitely more work to research recipes and cooking everything you want to eat, but your health is worth it 🙂

Jo Anne
Reply

I am glad to know you have had psorasis improvement with your gluten free diet. I am a long time sufferer of psorasis. 48 years to be exact. I have tried everything. Topicals, light treatments, accupunture, herbal medicine. You name it, I have tried it. A year ago I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease thru biopsy, so I have it, no doubt. 🙁 Because both diseases are autoimmune diseases, I was hopefull that my Celiac diet would improve by psorasis even though half a dozen dermatologists have told me diet has no effect on Psorasis. Anyway a GF diet has done just the opposite for me as it has for you. I do not cheat on my diet and in a year I have brought all my Celiac testing into normal ranges, but it is still a diet I must remain on for life. But the skin, is another matter. Getting progressively worse this year and I can pretty much see a new spot pop out daily. I am finally giving in and plan on starting Biologics as I can no longer stand the constant itching and flaking. I wish everyone well in their quest for good health.

Brandie Kajino
Reply

I’m sorry it isn’t working for you so far, Jo Anne. I do hope you find something that does!

Angela
Reply

Thank you for your story! I have had psoriasis starting at 4 on my nails and head and then elbows and feet started in my teens. I used to play the violin/viola almost every day for approx 15 years and I had to wear leather gloves due to the bleeding. My Dad noticed my psoriasis would go into remission when I swam and he had me soaking my hands in chlorine every day for a while but…that stopped. It just got weird sitting next to the spa/hot tub pump lol. I started using alpha hydroxy products for my face in my early 30s and if I could get over the pain of the first few days of application (it seemed to cause deep burning in my hands when I applied to my face), most of the psoriasis would clear on my hands but my nails were still wavy, weak and dented. My grandma had MS and my daughter has Aspergers Syndrome and I read that gluten might help so I started with her to show her that gluten free food wasn’t that bad (sometimes it was horrible!). I also watched a lecture about a doctor with MS and how changing her diet and removing gluten cured her…Learning psoriasis is an auto immune disorder helped me figure this out on my own. Doctors never listened and did not ever consider diet changes. My friend’s son has Autism and they determined that his was an auto immune response to an illness as an infant, that’s when I thought this gluten thing might work. I’ve only been off gluten for a week but everything is getting better. My hands, elbows and feet are clearing up, hair is less dry, skin looks better already. I have lost almost a pound a day and I haven’t even worked out. I usually work out regularly but I have been wondering why I wasn’t loosing weight…I think I know now. Thanks again!

Brandie Kajino
Reply

I’m so happy to hear that! I hope you’ll check back in and share how it goes 🙂

Anne
Reply

Hi there, this is my story, I had my beautiful daughter 24 years ago, around 3 years of age she developed a spot in her scalp, which went away in the summer. The following year it came back and she ended up with 40% of her body covered in plaque psoriasis. It was the worst time of my life, and I began frantically searching for answers as the consultant just told me she has this for the rest of her life. I cut out wheat and sugars in her diet and paid to have her tonsils removed as I was convinced it was linked to her psoriasis. With in days the psoriasis cleared. She was clear for around 8 years and around pubity it came back in varying degrees. She had light treatment and it cleared and came back after a good few months. I never made the connection between gluten until recently. She has always suffered from a bad stomach, bloating etc. Around a year ago she had her second batch of light treatment and it cleared. A few weeks ago it came back probably the worst she has ever had it. She has been suffering from headaches, stomach problems, vertigo, severely anxious and depressed, the list is endless. I began researching on the internet and am convinced that diet is involved (my husband has colitis and he is in remission after years of treatment that didnt work and solved it through diet). She has started a gluten free diet around two weeks ago, headaches have gone, foggy feeling has gone, no longer anxious and dizzy. Have noticed that her psoriasis isnt flaking any more (although it is so severe I fear it is going to take a long time). She is going to see a consultant on Tuesday with a view for more light treatment and I am going to speak to him about this and indeed carry on with the diet regardless of what he says. If it was me I would delay treatment but I fear she needs some clearance as its really affecting her life. I hope and pray diet works for her……………….would take it from her in a heart beat as it breaks my heart to see her suffer….. wish us luck xxxxxx

Brandie Kajino
Reply

I hope all that you’re doing helps her. She’s lucky to have a Mom who is so caring. 🙂

aelaine328
Reply

Hello Brandie,

I am so inspired by your journey. I am 24 and I was diagnosed with plaque psoriasis at the age of five. It’s been an uphill battle ever since. I was wondering if you have a family history of psoriasis and how long you have had it.

Thank you!

-Annie

Sharroneloine
Reply

Is this thread still active?
I am also suffering and need help.
Sharron

Brandie Kajino
Reply

Hi Sharron,
It sure is. I would read the others’ comments, and see what makes sense for you. Also, be sure and chat with your doctor as well.
All the best to you!

Keryn Maddicks Rivett
Reply

I could have written this! Thankyou, I have just shared this on my FB xxx

Klint McNade
Reply

I am 62 and have had psoriasis since I was a child. Like everyone else I tried virtually everything and just had to learn to live with it. It worsened as I got older. With age I had gained some weight and had trouble losing it. A friend had lost weight just cutting out bread products, so I gave that a try. Eggs and berries for breakfast, no toast. I began to eat the middle of the sandwich and left out the bread at lunch. Dinner was meat or fisn and one or two vegetables. My skin began to clear for the first time in forever. I found it interesting. Online I saw that some folks were having success with gluten free diets, so I read more. I have gradually lessened the gluten in my diet and my skin continues to improves so that my psoriasis is barely noticible after three months of all this. This is now late December and I live in New England, so I have not even been out in the sun for a while. With the cold dry air my skin should now be worsening for the winter season. But no, it is the best it has been since I was a child, not completely clear, but almost. And I have not been a gluten free fanatic – more like gluten-light. I will still have a beer occasionally. I buy gluten free cookies (one does need to live life) from the gluten free isle in the grocery store. But mostly I have just begun to eat less wheat products and this has worked amazingly well for me. I work in healthcare as a healthcare provider and find it disconcerting that my dermatologist was so skeptical about my success. She attributed my improved skin to weight loss – a 15 whole pounds – big deal. But my skin never cleared when I lost weight in the past and it was in terrible condition when I was skinny. She believed the medical studies, which can be very biased in favor of drug companies who sponsor some of the studies, rather than her own eyes and my story. This may not work for you, but it might. And you may not need to be as strict about gluten as someone with celiac disease. But then again, the positve skin results may tend to make you pause about having that second microbrew or a big plate of pasta. I hope this helps someone else.

rajivsage1
Reply

Brandie,

Thanks for sharing. In one of your responses, you mentioned that “everyone has their own trigger”. You’re right, but I’d add that having access/reading posts like yours certainly influences a personal trigger point. Or said differently, I believe that our trigger point is a function of the accumulated knowledge of this disease. Let me illustrate; here is where I stand in this battle against psoriasis. I am 27 and I’ve had it since I was 23 (right after I graduated from university and started working). Since then, it has slowly spread to more visible parts of my body and to the point where I only wear long sleeves and jeans to go out. Dermatologists started me with topicals (when skipped a few days, it flared up worse), then on to Metotrexate (a low dosage resulted in a doubling of my liver enzymes) and now I’m in the final stages of pre-tests (TB tests etc) in preparation for Enbrel. A while back, a friend of mine indicated that a gluten free diet may help, but i turned a deaf ear, because I wasn’t going to torture myself just based on hearsay. Now I’ve stumbled on your post and I’m more than excited to try a GF diet. Your testimonial is real to me: your writing style, your emotion and your consideration of the views of all parties in this GF diet journey. You presented something much more real (and therefore much more convincing) than any regular WebMD article or conclusive statistical study. So, there it is- as of last week, I was willing to go on Enbrel, because I had given up. Now, having read your post, I am committed to finding a more natural remedy for my disease. Had I not stumbled on your page, had you not blogged about your experience, had these wonderful people not commented on your post, I would have gone on a different path and with a different trigger point. Knowledge is power! Thanks so much for this testimonial. Wish me luck! 🙂

-Rajiv

Chari
Reply

Thanks for sharing! I believe I have psoriasis of the scalp and want to find the underlying cause(s) rather than using medicines ect. to cure the ‘symptoms’.

rvgm08
Reply

Brandi,
I enjoyed your bold dive into gluten free. I have psoriatic arthritis and went gluten free about 6 months ago due to severe intestinal issues. I love the bloat be gone and the change in movements. I look forward to getting into some of your recipes.
Val

ncaronia
Reply

Thank you! I have Hashimoto’s Disease and have been gluten free for almost three years now. I am also soy, nightshade, and dairy free. I think I need to go off all grains, but I do eat corn. Soooo, I found your blog post because for the past two months I have the worst scalp psoriasis on the back of my neck. I stopped using shampoo and conditioner last August when the psoriasis first flared up and use baking soda and apple cider vinegar. It went away almost immediately. I ran out of the vinegar as a rinse two months ago and keep forgetting to buy more. I used this conditioner I have thinking, no big deal. Well, I was wrong. I have red, itchy splotchy patches all over my neck. I checked the conditioner today. Guess what–it is made with hydrolized wheat protein. Yeah, I’m allergic. Thanks for reinforcing what I thought I was going on.

Heatherlynn
Reply

Hi Brandie! I also live in the PNW. I’ve been suffering from psoriasis for 3 years now. 2 weeks ago I decided that I’m done with all the meds and needles and I started my journey to healing myself internally. Your post is very inspiring and gives me hope in my journey.

Amy Williamson
Reply

I had psoriasis soooo bad in my scalp for more than 10 years when I stumbled into doing a South Beach diet (cut out all carbs for several weeks). It took a WEEK and my psoriasis was itching less and less until it was gone by the 3rd month. Gone. I instantly made the connection because I had read before that it may be gluten but I was skeptical and it wasn’t until I tried the SB diet to lose weight after a baby that figured it out.
i still have a patch or two that pop up maybe on my leg or elbow but nothing anyone would notice and a little sun helps those spots.
I’m glad you found relief too!
– Amy in Texas

Katy
Reply

I have been gluten free for one year now. I had psoriasis really badly with big, big red spots on my legs and back and everything itched! My scalp was covered. When I would shake my head it looked like a blizzard. I was also diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis. I was stiff and starting to waddle when I walked. Ran into a friend at a wedding who saw me and told me about the gluten-free diet her doctor put her on. I started it immediately and had little luck with it. She contacted me about 3 weeks into the diet and told me that tapioca may be the reason I was not getting better. Tapioca is found in a lot of GF baked goods and GF flours. I cut tapioca out also and the difference is astonishing! I cleared up completely in about 2 months after that revelation. It has been hard sticking to the diet but it has cleared up the stomach pain I had when I ate. My hair got shinier. My skin looked healthier. It was a miracle. I have been GF for a year and now it is not so bad. I take my tablet to the store to check ingredients on things if I am not sure they are safe. There are so many gluten-free foods now that it is pretty easy to substitute. I live in south Louisiana where everything starts with a roux, i.e flour and oil. I have found Zatarains makes some absolutely scrumptious gumbo and jambalya mixes that are gluten free. It is still hard to go out to eat here because it is a small town and not many restaurants have GF choices. Thank God for Chic-Fil-A for fast foods. But my alternative to GF was to take shots and not only do I hate shots, but I know that the medicine has many, many bad side effects. I went to my 45th reunion this summer and everybody raved about how good I looked. I have also been tanning for about 15 to 20 minutes a day when the sun is out and taking Vitamin D as per doctor’s orders. Every now and then I get a very tiny spot, but nothing that itches. My husband has gone GF also and it has cleared up his psoriasis also. The ends of his fingers split rather than his getting red spots. I have been getting a few spots on my scalp lately but I think I have found out why by reading all of these posts. Thanks to all for sharing.

Beverly
Reply

I have dealt with psoriasis since I was 18 and I’m now 52. I’ve been through tar based creams, steroid creams, ointments, light treatments, antibiotic treatments. It wasn’t until recently that I looked at articles on gluten and psoriasis. I thought I’d give it a try. I eliminated and drastically reduces, milk products, red meat, and anything that has gluten. I eat mostly vegies, gluten free hummus, I try to drink as much water as I can, almost a 1/2 gallon daily. I take vitamin D, B12, fish for omega 3, and a probiotic. Oh and no alcohol. In about 3-4 weeks I saw my plaque psoriasis flatten and lighten. When I get stressed, I try to take deep breaths and focus on my breathing like meditation. I also have been getting more exercise. I’m hoping my continuing this that my skin will continue to clear. I haven’t been tested yet for gluten allergy but it doesn’t matter as all this seems to be helping and I’m not sure if it’s just gluten or everything combined but it feels good.

HEATH
Reply

Any updates or improvements?

daisym
Reply

My daughter used to have severe psoriasis, and when the outbreaks were really bad, we used the Somaluxe Argan Oil directly on the outbreaks, and that made them heal faster for her. After using it for sometime, her psoriasis became less. Good luck to you !

Mary
Reply

Brandie, thanks for the encouragement. My husband, struggles with gluten, carbs, and sugar in general because of his chronic illness. There are SO many trolls who cloud the water with bad and incomplete science and don’t respect how damaging gluten can be. I just saw an article in Time magazine that we are “wasting” our money on gluten free foods. Well, maybe. If you are buying high carb processed junk with GMO ingredients, yeah, you may be killing yourself slowly and not addressing the other big problems with modern food. But what if you are using a SUPERfood like coconut flour in place of the wheat flour? Just MAYBE our country wouldn’t be SICK all the time (and dying) like we were suffering from radiation sickness or something if we actually ditched the wheat and prepared our own wheat-free food? I know it is only part of the problem, but with some great gluten-free recipes, life becomes a lot more fun, and you can look forward to old age with health instead of being stuck in some stinky room in a nursing home hoping someone would put you out of your misery (I know morbid thought, but check these statistics!
http://www.coconutcountryliving.com/the-top-7-benefits-of-coconut-flour/

P.S. I don’t believe in assisted suicide, but sometimes I empathize with the people who have ruined their emotional and physical health by not listening to their “health nut” friends. I say be humble and give a healthy grain-free diet a try before you knock it (and yes, let’s put the Kevorkians of the world out of business)!

Sudhir
Reply

Hey. This post is inpsirational in many ways. My wife suffers from scalp psoriosis. I did lot of study and came to conclusion. Your points are backing my conclusion. Let my wife try gluten free food + cod liver oil + biotin tabs for few months. I will update the results here. Thank you very much 🙂

Tracey
Reply

Hi This is just what I needed to find , I am at my wits end I have been diagnosed with Plaque and severe scalp psoriasis at the age of 49 and told it was brought on by severe stress its only been a few months since my diagnosis and already im sick of the lotions and potions none of which seem to work for longer than a few days, then my spots take over again. im now working towards going GF sooner rather than later after reading your inspiring post and all of the other post from people who have found relief after suffering for years. thank you for giving me the information and belief that I may have come across the answer. my new life will start from my very next meal 🙂

Paul
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Is there anyone out there who can say whether eliminating gluten AND casein (cow’s milk) has made a difference in the recover time???

Cesar Hernandez
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In addition to Gluten free products , have you done something else? Do you still consume sugary products/refined sugar. What about dairy products?.

Brandie
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At this point I was focusing on gluten. I also don’t eat a lot of sugar, which helps.

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